Turkey to search Saudi consulate for Khashoggi's disappearance, Foreign Ministry says

Clay Curtis
October 9, 2018

Turkey has asked for permission to search Saudi Arabia's consulate for prominent Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who went missing last week, broadcaster NTV said on Monday.

A Turkish official separately told The Associated Press that authorities believe Jamal Khashoggi was killed at the Saudi Consulate, while another said it was a "high probability".

"Do you not have cameras and everything of the sort?" The consulate insists the writer left its premises, contradicting Turkish officials. "They have all of them. Why don't you prove it, you have to prove it".

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called upon the Saudi Arabian government "to support a thorough investigation of Mr. Khashoggi's disappearance and to be transparent about the results of that investigation".

He added Saudi Arabia is investigating Khashoggi's disappearance through the foreign ministry and said it was prepared to welcome the Turkish government to search the consulate.

Despite the rift over Qatar, Ankara has maintained a cautious approach toward Riyadh and bilateral contacts have continued.

It was Khashoggi's second visit to finalise his divorce, after being told the previous Friday that his papers were not in order.

Turkish authorities believe Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was killed in the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul last week.

The head of the Turkish-Arab Media Association, Turan Kislakci, told the New York Times that Turkish police officers providing security for the consulate had checked their security cameras and did not see the journalist leave on foot.

The door Khashoggi walked in through appeared to be the main entrance of the consulate in Istanbul's 4th Levent neighbourhood, a leafy, upscale district near the city's financial hub that's home to several other consulates. The UK foreign office said reports Khashoggi was abducted or killed by the Saudi government were "extremely serious allegations".

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Turkish authorities have told Middle East Eye they believe Khashoggi was killed soon after entering the building.

Turkey has yet to make any evidence public.

Ms Cengiz took to Twitter to say that she "did not believe he has been killed" and that she was waiting for official confirmation.

The announcement came as the Post published a surveillance image of Khashoggi walking into the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, just before he disappeared.

"He disagreed with some of the policies of Mohammed bin Salman, but he was not a political dissident, he's not leading any organised network, he was a journalist - he wanted to write and to speak freely, and that was the reason he left Saudi Arabia". He added, "Speculation does not help our mission".

Qatari citizens openly criticized the false and fabricated media stories by the regime's mouthpieces in Doha since the disappearance of Khashoggi in Istanbul.

Khashoggi was one journalist who chose to "report the reality".

During the meeting, Ryan expressed The Post's "grave concern" about Khashoggi's disappearance.

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Khashoggi was seen entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last week but never came out. He left the country previous year for the United States fearing retribution from the kingdom which has recently witnessed widespread crackdown on dissent.

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