United Nations Climate Report Warns Miami Basically Screwed

Katie Ramirez
October 10, 2018

Henn was actually responding to Penn State University climate scientist Michael Mann who was pushing back against those criticizing the IPCC report as too "alarmist" in its declarations and warnings.

Climate economist William Nordhaus has been made a Nobel laureate. The events are being reported as two parts of the same story, but they reveal the contradictions inherent in climate policy-and why economics matters more than ever.

The report is seen as the main scientific guide for government policymakers on how to implement the 2015 Paris Agreement, which is to be discussed at the Katowice Climate Change Conference in Poland in December.

The scientists claim increased temperatures are leading to extreme weather, rising sea levels, and diminishing Arctic sea ice, among other changes to the environment. This would require a massive swing to renewable energy, with any residual emissions being scrubbed from the atmosphere using carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), and carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies.

But it adds if temperatures rise by 2C, the effects will be more pronounced and more people will be put at risk of poverty and water stress, with higher health risks.

The report stressed the half-degree difference was life changing. But even a 1.5°C rise in temperature will be threatening to India.

After the report's publication there were headlines like: "We have 12 years to act on climate change before the world as we know it is lost".

The dramatic report warned that the planet is now heading to warm by 3C - and to slash that to less than 1.5C as laid out in the Paris agreement will require "rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society".

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"The math just doesn't work well."The Paris agreement signatories committed to work toward limiting warming to 1.5 C, and the IPCC report found that catastrophic impacts could be avoided if they succeed".

Individuals and civic groups have a big role to play in pushing governments to tackle climate threats, and are stepping up pressure as recognition of the danger grows, she said. "The next few years are probably the most important in our history".

Current government commitments to curb climate change under the Paris pact, even if fully met, would still leave the world on track for warming of about 3 degrees Celsius, scientists said.

Around 6 percent of insects, 8 percent of plants, and 4 percent of vertebrates are projected to be negatively affected by global warming of 1.5°C, namely by shrinking their natural geographic range, compared with 18 percent of insects, 16 percent of plants and 8 percent of vertebrates for global warming of 2°C.

If 1.5 degrees of warming does occur, Southeast Asian countries like Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam, including countries like Japan, China, Egypt, and the US will experience increased flooding by 2040.

Can we get climate change under control? President Macron's One Planet Summit followed in NY during Climate Week, bringing together leaders of finance who were optimistic that managing climate risk is not only possible, but an exciting challenge that would also be profitable as new industries arise to do the most important work the world has ever demanded.

Hong Kong's climate action plan, published a year ago, only pledges a 26 to 36 per cent cut by 2030 from 2005 levels.

Professor Corinne Le Quere, from the University of East Anglia, said: "For the United Kingdom, this means a rapid switch to renewable energy and electric cars, insulating our homes, planting trees, where possible walking or cycling and eating well - more plants and less meat - and developing an industry to capture carbon and store it underground".

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