Google altering business model of Android to comply with European regulations

Ruben Fields
October 17, 2018

The EC's stipulation that companies were being hindered by their inability to ship devices with forked versions of Android is of dubious merit, and now there's a very real possibility that Google-sanctioned devices - a vast majority of Androids sold in the EEA - will cost more when they hit store shelves.

The changes are in response to a almost $5 billion fine levied at Google by the European Commission.

Google's solution to the European Union order puts more distance between its mobile app store, through which millions of Android users may discover and install new apps, and the many sister apps that help sustain Google's deep relationships with customers.

Google is also splitting up the licenses for Android, the Google Search app, and Chrome.

Hiroshi Lockheimer, Google's head of Android, said the company would begin to offer the licenses October 26, but he didn't say what the pricing would be.

In a blog post, Hiroshi Lockheimer, Senior Vice President, Platforms & Ecosystems for Google, has revealed how they will comply with the EU's directions.

Blow for Liverpool as Sadio Mane suffers hand injury in Senegal training
But the 32-year-old has made a quicker than expected recovery and could be included in Jurgen Klopp's starting eleven on Saturday.

For Google, the change is a major shift for its mobile business.

Brussels accused Google of using the Android system's dominance of smartphones and tablets to promote the use of its own Google search engine and shut out rivals.

Secondly, Google will offer commercial agreements to partners for the non-exclusive pre-installation and placement of Google Search and Chrome.

Although Google has always allowed OEMs to pre-install other competitive services on Android smartphones and tablets, OEMs could not release Android devices with the Google suite of apps and devices without Google apps in the EAA.

"We have confirmed to the European Commission how we will comply with its recent decision on Android", said Al Verney, a spokesperson for Google in Brussels. The European Commision claims Google's practice of pre-installing apps like Search and Chrome on Android make it hard for the competition. As before, competing apps may be pre-installed alongside ours.

One major change being made is that companies that make Google Play devices will now be able to also make non-Google Play Android, also known as forked or AOSP (Android Open Source Project), devices.

Other reports by

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER