Russian Federation blames rocket failure on mistake during assembly

Katie Ramirez
November 1, 2018

Russian officials believe that the defective component was damaged during assembly.

A Russian Soyuz rocket carrying two people failed mid-flight on October 12.

The crew capsule performed as designed: it separated and made a ballistic return to Earth with astronauts American Tyler "Nick" Hague and Russian Alexey Ovchinin shaken and stirred, but unharmed.

The last time Russian Federation saw an aborted manned launch was in 1983, when two Soviet cosmonauts jettisoned and landed safely after a launch pad explosion.

The findings of an official investigation into the incident were presented at a press conference on Thursday.

The next manned mission to the International Space Station may launch on December 3, state news agency TASS cited Russian space agency Roscosmos as saying on Wednesday.

Krikalyov said the astronauts now on the ISS - Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, NASA's Serena Aunon-Chancellor, and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos-are expected to back on Earth "around December 20".

What happened during the flight?

Oil prices down more than 1 percent on rising supply, trade war
Moreover, in a sign of things to come, hedge-fund and money managers are trimming their bets that crude oil prices will rise. An exchange shop displays rates for various currencies, in downtown Tehran, October 2, 2018.

The Soyuz rocket used to launch astronauts has three stages, or segments.

Live video of the astronauts inside showed them shaking violently with vibrations caused by the malfunction.

The two crew members were then recovered by emergency workers near the Kazakh city of Dzhezkazgan, 400km (250 miles) north-east of the rocket launch site.

After investigating the incident, Russia's space agency, Roscosmos, determined that one of the rocket's boosters failed and remained stuck to the main rocket body instead of peeling off.

"The reason for the abnormal separation. was due to a deformation of the stem of the contact separation sensor.", Skorobogatov told reporters.

Roscosmos officials explained that a malfunctioning sensor led to an issue with the separation between the two rocket stages, causing one piece of the rocket to fail to separate fully, sending the rocket into a spin and prompting the instant abort.

Alexander Lopatin, the deputy head of Roscosmos, said that "appropriate law enforcement authorities" will now look into who was responsible for the assembly error.

They had initially been scheduled to land on December 13 after their stint on the ISS, a joint project of the space agencies of America, Europe, Russia, Japan and Canada.

Other reports by

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER