Best Diet of 2019? Dieticians choose Mediterranean

Grant Boone
January 7, 2019

The Nordic diet, focused on vegetables, whole grains, fatty fish and berries, is tied for third place in the best plant-based diets on U.S. News and World Report's newly-released list of best diets for 2019.

It is followed by the DASH Diet, which tied the with Mediterranean diet for the top spot a year ago. While fad diets will come and go, there are some tried-and true healthy eating plans that can help get you on the right track.

According to the report, people there tend to live longer and are far less likely than Americans to suffer from cancer or heart disease.

If you're gearing up to eat healthier this year, consider including whole grains, seafood, and healthy fats in your diet. It also limits red meat, salt, and candies.

To determine the best diets, a panel of nutritionists and specialists in diabetes, heart health, and weight loss reviewed 41 diets, including the increasingly popular ketogenic, or keto, diet, Weight Watchers, and Atkins.

The flexitarian diet encourages people to try alternative meat options, like tofu, but leaves room for flexibility if you can't quite fully give up meat. Other diets at the bottom of the list included the Dukan diet, the Body Reset Diet and the Whole30 diet. The term was coined by registered dietitian Dawn Jackson Blatner in her book "The Flexitarian Diet: The Mostly Vegetarian Way to Lose Weight, Be Healthier, Prevent Disease and Add Years to Your Life".

Jets Interview Adam Gase for Head Coaching Position
The roster revamp is expected to include the departure of quarterback Ryan Tannehill , who has been with the team since 2012. Miami has finished with six to eight wins in nine of the past 10 years, and hasn't won a playoff game since 2000.

Another diet based on a healthy region of the world, the Mediterranean diet, holds the top overall spot this year for the first time in U.S. News and World Report's rankings.

And no, unfortunately, there is still no magic fix for losing weight, but there are certain diets that have been shown to be more successful. In fact, one study found the diet may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease by as much as 53 percent. The Harvard School of Public Health and a think tank called Oldways created a diet based on the general eating principles of these places, according to US News.

"On these types of diets, you often don't learn how to manage holidays, stressful days or special occasions".

The plan focuses on fruit, vegetables, whole grain, lean protein and low-fat dairy and eliminates foods high in fat and sugar-sweetened drinks and candies, according to U.S. News and World Report.

Doctors say healthy weight loss is just one to two pounds per week.

But the diet topping any list isn't necessarily the best diet for you.

Other reports by

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER