Felicity Huffman seen for first time since armed Federal Bureau of Investigation arrest

Brenda Watkins
March 14, 2019

Federal prosecutors in Boston charged William "Rick" Singer, 58, with running the scheme through his Edge College & Career Network, which charged up to $2.5 million per child for the services, which were masked as contributions to a scam charity. In October, Huffman was recorded by the Federal Bureau of Investigation allegedly discussing participating in the same scheme for her younger daughter; however, she did not ultimately pursue it.

Fuller House star Lori Loughlin is among the defendants. She was finally released from custody late Tuesday, exiting the courthouse to throngs of reporters.

The scandal has gone viral across the internet, forcing Huffman to disable commenting on her Instagram posts and Loughlin to delete all her social accounts entirely. Prosecutors in the USA attorney's office in Boston say his company, Edge College & Career Network, amassed $25 million through the fraud. The parents bribed college coaches and other insiders to get their children into selective schools, authorities said.

Loughlin, who is known for portraying Aunt Becky on "Full House" and for starring in numerous Hallmark Channel movies, will appear in court again in Boston on March 29.

ICYMI: the actress is one of at least 40 others charged this morning in a massive bribery scam involving elite colleges in the United States, including Georgetown University, Stanford University, UCLA, the University of San Diego, USC, University of Texas, Wake Forest, and Yale.

A magistrate judge said Tuesday that actress Felicity Huffman - the "Desperate Housewives" star - can be released on $250,000 bail in a case in which she is accused of paying a bribe to secure her daughter's admission to college, AP reported.

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Prosecutors said it was up to the universities to decide what to do with students admitted through cheating.

Court papers said a cooperating witness met with Ms Huffman and Macy at their Los Angeles home and explained to them that he "controlled" a testing centre and could have somebody secretly change her daughter's answers.

Prosecutors allege the couple paid $500,000 to have their daughters labeled as crew-team recruits at the University of Southern California, even though neither is a rower.

"I was essentially buying or bribing the coaches for a spot", Singer said as he pleaded guilty to charges including racketeering, money laundering and obstruction of justice.

John Vandemoer, a former Stanford University sailing coach who worked with Singer, also pleaded guilty to racketeering conspiracy.

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