New Zealand PM vows gun reforms after racist mosque massacre

Brenda Watkins
March 16, 2019

In the wake of New Zealand's worst mass shooting in history, New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has promised to move quickly to strengthen national security through measures like working with Australia. Peneha then went into the mosque to help the victims.

Law enforcement officials in other cities across the country, including NY and Los Angeles, have also said they are increasing security forces at mosques in response to the shooting.

Two other people remain in custody, although their link to the attack is unknown.

Speaking at a press conference on Saturday morning, Ms Ardern said the Australian man, identified as Brenton Tarrant, suspected of carrying out the terrorist act had used five firearms in the attacks, including two semi-automatic weapons, two shotguns and a lever-action firearm.

Muslims account for just over 1 percent of New Zealand's population, a 2013 census showed.

Facebook, Twitter and Google companies scrambled to take down the gunman's video, which was widely available on social media for hours after the horrific attack.

Dozens of people laid flowers at cordons near both mosques in Christchurch, which is still rebuilding after a devastating quake in 2011 that killed nearly 200 people.

After going back outside and shooting a woman there, he gets back in his auto, where the song "Fire" by the English rock band The Crazy World of Arthur Brown can be heard blasting.

No more public engagements for Meghan Markle
It will coincide with the move of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex to Frogmore Cottage in Windsor before their baby arrives. The new Sussex household will be based at Buckingham Palace - alongside the Queen .

New Zealand's gun laws have remained largely unchanged since 1992, when the 1983 law was toughened in response to another massacre in which 13 people died. "There were three in the hallway, at the door leading into the mosque, and people inside the mosque", he said.

India's high commissioner to New Zealand, Sanjiv Kohli, tweeted Saturday that nine Indians were missing and called the attack a "huge crime against humanity".

He was living in Dunedin, a seaside city south of Christchurch, has traveled around the world and spent sporadic periods in New Zealand. The gunman in question demonstrated ties to numerous extreme-right ideologies and individuals in his manifesto and livestream of the attack, during which he mentioned the YouTuber.

From what we know, it does appear to have been well planned.

Restoring Family Links: Local authorities are asking people to share this website where people in the community can connect with loved ones, register missing persons, or mark themselves safe.

Christchurch was the home of these victims.

The Quebec City mosque attacked by Bissonnette posted the following brief message: "We are following with worry the terrorist attack that occurred against two mosques in New Zealand".

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