This is Ariana Grande's brain on PTSD. 'Not a joke,' she says

Brenda Watkins
April 13, 2019

Ariana Grande has never shied away from talking about her mental health - especially since the traumatic 2017 bombing at her concert in Manchester, England, that left her with anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

The singer posted a pic comparing a "heathy" brain and her own, showing the damages caused by her PTSD on IG stories yesterday.

She adds that other scans that show the impact of traumatic stress on the brain can include an MRI, fMRI, positron emission tomography (PET), and single-photon emission tomography (SPECT).

"I just wanted to say hi and remind you guys to protect your peace and your energy and to not forget to take care of yourselves and protect your space", she said, speaking directly to the camera.

Grande said she didn't think she'd ever know how to talk about the attack "and not cry" in a July 2018 interview with British Vogue.

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Barr didn't answer, insisting he has said everything he planned to say about the report until it comes out. He said that though he did not have specific evidence of wrongdoing, "I do have questions about it".

"When I got home from tour, I had really wild dizzy spells, this feeling like I couldn't breathe". For example, hypervigilance. It's noticing everything and constantly scanning my environment; being alert even when I'm trying to sleep - it's depleting and it never stops.

After the attack, Grande, 25, told Elle about physical problems she had suffered. "There were a couple months straight where I felt so upside down". "This is just the beginning", the terrorist group said.

The Boca Raton pop singer shared brain scans to highlight how her brain has been affected by the terrorist act at her London concert two years ago that killed almost two dozen people.

She captioned the image: "My brain". "But without pictures, you're throwing darts in the dark at people", Amen told the Daily Mail. "This gives [Grande's] doctors a map to work with".

"I wish there was more that I could fix", she said, according to People.

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