Anti-poaching rangers share incredible selfies casually hanging out with gorillas

Katie Ramirez
April 25, 2019

Mathieu Shamavu, a park ranger at Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo, was at work when he snapped the photo with the hilarious primates and his co-worker, Patrick, the New York Daily News reported.

Two gorillas at the Virunga National Park in Congo looked extraordinarily human-like as they posed for selfies with anti-poaching rangers.

"You might have recently seen caretakers Mathieu and Patrick's unbelievable selfie with female orphaned gorillas Ndakazi and Ndeze inside the Senkwekwe center at Virunga National Park".

As the picture went viral on Facebook with over 22,000 shares, many said it was stunning and incredible.

According to BBC, which spoke with Virunga's deputy director Innocent Mburanumwe, the gorillas' mothers were both killed in July 2007.

"You might have recently seen caretakers Mathieu and Patrick's incredible selfie with female orphaned gorillas Ndakazi and Ndeze inside the Senkwekwe center at Virunga National Park".

This photo, it said, was an exceptional circumstance, and gorillas should not be approached in the wild.

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The Virunga National Park is home to 22 primate species, including three great apes.

Virunga was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1979 and contains six gorilla families. As a result, the two gorillas were at ease with the staff.

All of the rangers go through an extensive six-month training regime to become guardians of the park.

After Congo's independence in 1960, the park deteriorated rapidly until 1969 when President Mobutu revived it after taking a personal interest in conservation.

In the Facebook post, the park said the gorillas were always "acting cheeky".

De Waal said the reason gorillas imitate human behavior is "not because they think it is fun" but because "they identify with those who take care of them".

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