Justin Trudeau to meet Trump for talks on trade pact, detained Canadians

Clay Curtis
June 15, 2019

China has demanded her release, but Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland says Canadians around the world could be less safe if we bowed to China's demand.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is heading to Washington, DC next week, to meet with US President Donald Trump.

Canada is located between its two largest trading partners on this issue, and Trudeau insists that Canada must follow the rule of law, but this tactic doesn't succeed with the leaders of China.

Trump has called for Spavor and Kovrig to be freed, but continues to suggest Huawei-the source of Canada's China troubles-could be a bargaining chip in a trade deal with China.

They will also talk about the cases of Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, two Canadians detained in China since December 2018.

Meng is living in a Vancouver mansion on bail awaiting an extradition hearing scheduled to start in early 2020.

Freeland has made it no secret that she typically tried and failed to salvage a gathering alongside side her counterpart, Chinese language International Minister Wang Yi.

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Trudeau said last week he would look at whether it was "appropriate or desirable" to seek a meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping on the sidelines of a Group of 20 summit in Japan later this month.

Doing so would be an phenomenal act for a Canadian justice minister, in step with a secret memo written to the high minister nearly at present after Meng's arrest, received below obtain entry to to records legislation by CBC Info.

"It would be a very unsafe precedent indeed for Canada to alter its behavior when it comes to honoring an extradition treaty in response to external pressure", Freeland said.

"We would without complications procure ourselves in a ache where, by performing in a single particular case, we would in actuality manufacture all Canadians around the sphere much less protected", she said. "And that's a accountability I eliminate very seriously".

"In phrases of Ms. Meng, there used to be no political interference. This has been entirely about officials taking choices in step with Canada's commitments, and that is the true ability for extradition requests to proceed".

The Liberal government has rallied its allies to drum up support for Canada in its diplomatic row with China.

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