Two North Koreans deported as probe finds mass murder charge

Clay Curtis
November 7, 2019

"Their boat initially left the North Korean port of Kimchaek with 19 people on board in mid-August".

South Korea deported two North Koreans accused of murdering 16 fellow fishermen on Thursday after the pair had fled south from their homeland.

"The government has chose to deport them as they have committed a heinous crime".

Denouncing the move as a "declaration of confrontation" against North Korea, the official described the Pentagon's intentions to proceed with the exercises as "reckless military frenzy" that is "extremely provocative and unsafe".

A unification ministry official declined to give specifics about the murders, but Seoul's joint investigation team confirmed that the men killed 16 people "very cruelly" with "blunt objects". Neither can they be regarded as refugees under global law because they are vicious criminals.

"We also assessed that if they were accepted into our society, they would pose danger to our people's lives and safety as vicious criminals who can not be recognized as refugees under worldwide law". It said a South Korean investigation later found the two had killed 16 colleagues aboard a fishing boat and escaped to South Korea.

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Two North Korean fishermen who killed their captain and 15 other crew members before defecting to the South have been deported back today as 'serious criminals'.

The defectors are interrogated by South Korean intelligence authorities upon arrival and spend about three months in a government-run facility for re-education before they are discharged into society.

Kim said that the two fugitives evaded the South Korean navy in the East Sea for two days after first crossing into the South.

Russian fisheries chiefs claims they have detained more than 3,000 North Korean fishermen for fishing in its territorial waters this year, up from 863 in all of 2018.

Ministry spokesman Lee Sang-min said South Korea made a decision to expel the two fishermen to North Korea because they were "heinous criminals" who could not be recognized as refugees under global laws.

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